Make the Days count with Opportunity Thinking

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One of the things that fascinates me as a coach and a people watcher, is the remarkable achievements people make, even when faced with a mountain to climb.

I’ve just finished reading a book about Katie Piper, a beautiful TV presenter, who had acid thrown in her face by an ex boyfriend. The agony, pain, fear and then the realisation, acceptance, joy was an engrossing read.  The destination reached was because she never gave up and grabbed every opportunity to make her life better and of those who also suffered burns and acid attacks.

I would go as far as to say that she turned a tragedy into a personal triumph,

Opportunity thinking requires spotting them in the first place, being open to new ideas, courage to take them, welcoming the challenges and evaluating often.

The opposite to opportunity thinkers are those who don’t like to hope in case they are disappointed, who wear the black hat to think about how it all might fail (useful in a team but not the way to live life to the full). They are full of fear and pessimism.

And the most successful people are optimistic.

The first step towards becoming more confident and bold, and therefore more likely to be an opportunity taker, is to achieve the goals you have already set yourself – and then set some more. Constant learning and personal development is a fun and rewarding way to live a life and i also have a theory that mother nature appreciates a being that doesn’t stand still rather than a being that just carries out the same things day in day out, never growing, expanding or changing.

Work backwards from the dreams you want and break down the actions required. Make sure you understand the consequences of your decisions, thinking of all the stakeholders involved.

If your mind isn’t aligned it with your values and the people you care about, aims and goals are far less likely to happen.

Know your ‘Why’ – this is a biggy.

What are the daily, weekly, monthly commitments to this action – what can you delegate or where can you ask for help? From whom?

What are the risks and what are the acceptable levels? Where are the real opportunities?

Think about when convenience is chosen over difficult action or decisions – take my 10/10/10 test, which is:

How does this decision affect the next 10 days,  10 weeks,  10 months etc. Sometimes short term thinking is valid, sometimes long term solutions are more desirable.

Be the Captain of your Own Ship. Set sail but don’t ignore other horizons.

And if there are barriers or challenges, see them as pirates that you need to throw off your ship. Pirate Procrastination being the first one to throw overboard, followed by Pirate Pessism!

And if you want to get there even faster – hire a coach, like me!